Publications

Watching Brief – September 2016

Home Insights Watching Brief – September 2016

Matter of opinion

The Electoral Spin Cycle

New Zealand has a short electoral cycle compared with most other western democracies and the implications are once again being felt. Just two years on from the last election, everything and everyone is gearing up for the next one, with the associated impacts on political discourse, policy development, and the legislative agenda also becoming apparent.

The Government’s focus has already shifted away from new policy, as reflected in the Parliamentary work load. There is little of interest on the Order Paper, leaving the media to pick over any private member’s bills that fall out of the ballot (left luggage was a matter of public debate!). The length of the electoral cycle impacts not only on policy development in the third year, but on the ability to undertake rigorous analysis, implement reforms, and observe outcomes throughout the electoral term. Given this, it can be of no great wonder that we are falling behind our OECD peers in many key policy areas.

Our three year electoral term was introduced in 1879 and has continued since, subject to three limited exceptions in times of national crisis (the last being in 1942 in the midst of WWII). An extension of the electoral term has never gained much popular support but a well-informed conversation about the impact of the current model is arguably overdue. In a changing and uncertain world there is a greater need than ever for a Government that has time to develop and implement cohesive policies – which electors can vote on – and not be preoccupied with imminent elections. It is for these reasons the Constitutional Advisory Panel, initiated by Bill English and the Māori Party, have discussed the option of a longer electoral term – an idea picked up by Sir Geoffrey Palmer and Dr Andrew Butler who recommend a four year term in a book they are launching on constitutional reform at the end of this month.

As for the year ahead, on current polling there is arguably not much the Government needs to do other than maintain the status quo and field off what it views as a broken second party. However, while the Government’s “policy lite” approach worked at the last election, it is not without risk. Labour and the Greens will be seeking to maximise their recent Memorandum of Understanding, focusing on issues where the Government is exposed, such as housing and wealth / income inequality. Public interest in climate change is also an unknown for this Government, and while it has not been a focus for the media and the public over recent years, we may catch up with the alarm resonating around the world, most recently represented by China signing up to the Paris Agreement.

Perhaps recognising these risks, some commentators have recommended that the Prime Minister call an early snap election in order to maximise political advantage. The Rt Hon Winston Peters has gone so far as suggesting he will. The Prime Minister appeared unclear about his ability to call a snap election (he can), but it is to his credit that he has ruled this out as an option. Given the pattern over the last three elections, we can expect that John Key will give several months notice of an election in September / October next year.

The challenges for Labour and the Greens nevertheless remain overwhelming, not helped by the recent departure of Kevin Hague and, for Labour, the current lack of both a chief of staff and communications advisor. Short of a dramatic change in polling (perhaps driven by yet to be known events), they will need New Zealand First, yet history strongly suggests that Winston Peters will negotiate some form of accommodation within National. The Māori Party, Act, United Future (and the new People's party?), while representing an increasingly small percentage of the general vote could still swing the result if they win a seat or meet the thresholds and things get close.

Whatever one’s political standpoint, democracy relies on changes in Government from time to time. Good Government relies on any governing party’s ability to implement a coherent and consistent party programme over time. It’s time to reset the electoral cycle to four years.


In the news

Digital convergence and cyber security work programmes continue

The Broadcasting Minister, Hon Amy Adams, has announced a series of changes that will be made to the Broadcasting Act through a new Digital Convergence Bill (Bill). The Bill is aimed at updating the Act to reflect the modern age and the converging media market, where content can be accessed online, on demand, at any time.

The Bill is part of the Government’s review of content regulations, which highlighted confusion as to whether online content through on-demand sites is subject to the Broadcasting Act, the Film, Videos, and Publications Classification Act (FVPC Act), or no legislation at all.

To remedy this, the new Bill proposes:

  • extending the Broadcasting Act to capture on-demand content, and ensure that the content meets classification and content standards. The Bill will also make it clear that the FVPC Act does not apply to on-demand content; and
  • providing television broadcasters with the right to include advertising on Sunday mornings during significant events (for example, the Rugby World Cup). Advertising restrictions will still apply to Good Friday, Easter Sunday, Anzac Day, and Christmas Day.

The Broadcasting Standards Authority will continue to administer the standards system, with an extended role to encompass on-demand content. Any changes to rules around election programming will form part of the Government’s response to the 2014 Election Inquiry.

The Government also looked at the existing funding mechanisms which support New Zealand content, and concluded that they are able to cope with digital convergence. The Government continues to consider whether other improvements can be made to classification labels across different mediums; such as television, films and games.

The Minister has also announced a group of people who are to comprise the Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT) Establishment Advisory Board (Board). The Board will provide advice to the Minister for Communications and the Minister for Business, Innovation and Employment on the establishment of the CERT. They will also sit at the centre of the Government’s cyber security response, and will be the first port of call for cyber security incidents.

The Board is made up of eight experienced ICT practitioners, and is to be chaired by Michael Wallmannsberger, who is currently the Chief Information Security Officer at Wynyard Group.

The CERT is expected to be operational from early 2017.

The Ministers’ press release on the Digital Convergence Bill is accessible here, and an update on the Government's Convergence programme is available here. The Ministers’ press release on the CERT Board is accessible here.


FMA releases review of corporate governance disclosure

The Financial Markets Authority (FMA) has published the findings of its review into corporate governance disclosure by New Zealand listed and unlisted companies (Review). Good corporate governance is a strategic priority for the FMA, and the review comes after the FMA's 2014 publication of the corporate governance handbook (Handbook) that outlines nine key corporate governance principles.

The Review evaluates information provided by 45 companies in public disclosures (such as annual reports and websites) about how those companies addressed the corporate governance principles. The Review found that:

  • listed companies provided, on average, 67% of all information recommended by the Handbook; in contrast, unlisted companies provided, on average, 24%;
  • while it was possible to find the companies’ commentary on governance principles, few companies actually disclosed the relevant codes or policies; and
  • the principles least addressed by the 45 companies were stakeholder interests and reporting on remuneration.

The Review is intended to provide an indication of how seriously New Zealand companies take corporate governance, based on the information that they publicly provide to customers and stakeholders.

The FMA aims to encourage companies to improve the quality of reporting on corporate governance. This aim lends support to another of its priorities, investor decision-making, as outlined in its Strategic Risk Outlook. The FMA’s ultimate aim of this exercise is to improve confidence in New Zealand's capital markets.

Companies now have time to reflect on their own governance practices and disclosures in light of the Review, so as to continue to provide useful and clear information to shareholders and customers.

The FMA will continue to work closely with the NZX on its review of corporate governance reporting requirements for listed companies. The FMA will also continue to engage with stakeholders, such as the New Zealand Shareholders’ Association, the New Zealand Institute of Directors, and the Corporate Governance Forum, on corporate governance issues.

The Review is accessible here, and the associated press release can be found here.


Law Commission set to review law on declaratory judgments

The Justice Minister, Hon Amy Adams, has requested the Law Commission commence a first principles review of the Declaratory Judgments Act 1908 (Review).

A declaratory judgment is a judicial remedy which allows parties to go to the High Court and ask for clarification of their legal rights and obligations, without the need for further remedies. Declaratory judgments can be made in respect of public statutes and regulations, as well as private agreements. There are multiple sources of jurisdiction for declaratory judgments – the Declaratory Judgments Act 1908 being one of them.

In announcing the Review, the President of the Commission, Hon Douglas White QC, noted this is an area ripe for reform, with uncertainty in the scope of the remedies and “significant complexity caused by the overlap between the various sources under which a court may find jurisdiction”. For example, the President singled out the Declaratory Judgments Act 1908 as an area in need of modernisation, given its principal provision, section 3, is a single sentence of 172 words.

The Review will focus on modernising and simplifying the law surrounding declaratory judgments. It is expected to take two years, and will include consultation with the public, experts, and key interested parties. An Expert Advisory Group will also be convened to provide a range of perspectives.

The Review was announced by Minister Adams in November last year, and is the first of three new projects the Law Commission is scheduled to commence in 2016. Reviews of the Property (Relationships) Act 1976 and the Search and Surveillance Act 2012 are also under way (the review of the Search and Surveillance Act 2012 was required by section 357 of that Act to be referred to the Commission by 30 June 2016). Updates on the Review will be posted on the Commission’s website, which is accessible here. The Commission expects to report to the Minister with its recommendations by April 2018.

The Commission’s press release is available here.


New MBIE regulatory strategy announced

The Minister for Regulatory Reform, Hon Steven Joyce, has announced the release of a new Regulatory Management Strategy by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). The Strategy outlines MBIE’s regulatory priorities and includes system assessments and new regulatory charters; outlines an integrated approach to intelligence and enforcement; and institutes programmes designed to build capability for policy advisors and front line regulators. According to the Minister, the strategy is not only designed to improve the process by which regulation is made, but also to enhance the monitoring, assessment and enforcement of existing regulation. To this end, and to help MBIE become a ‘world-leading regulatory steward’, the Strategy prescribes six core functions, according to which the MBIE will measure its own performance, including:

  • the collection of information and identification of regulatory vulnerabilities;
  • cost-benefit analysis of regulatory proposals;
  • targeted enforcement and compliance practices;
  • the clear delegation of roles to agencies within the regulatory system;
  • flexibility in regulation such that regulated entities can adopt least-cost, innovative approaches to meeting their obligations; and
  • robust internal staffing and systems.

The publication of the Strategy follows the Government’s official response to the Productivity Commission’s 2015 report on regulatory institutions and practices. That response directed seven of the major regulatory institutions to be transparent about their regulatory regimes, the performance, monitoring and enforcement of those regimes, and the procedures and practices in place for improving them.

MBIE may have struck first, but the Regulatory Management Strategies of the six other departments (the Ministries of Transport, Environment, Justice and Primary Industries, as well as Inland Revenue and the Department of Internal Affairs) are also scheduled to appear online in the next few months.

The relevant MBIE website is here, and the Minister’s press release on the Strategy is here.


Productivity Commission recommends repairs to urban planning system

On 19 August 2016, the Productivity Commission released its draft report on ‘Better Urban Planning’ containing its findings on its ‘blue-skies thinking’ inquiry into ways to improve New Zealand’s urban planning system. The inquiry and report are distinct from the Resource Legislation Amendment Bill currently before the Local Government and Environment Select Committee and the National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity currently being finalised by the Ministry for the Environment.

The inquiry, requested by the Government late last year, sought to evaluate the way in which land use is currently determined in cities, including the processes required under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), the Local Government Act 2002 and the Land Transport Management Act 2003. This evaluation was aimed at identifying issues with the current system with a view to formulating a more appropriate system for the future that would offer flexibility and respond to the changing needs of cities.

The inquiry identified a number of concerns with the current system, including:

  • a lack of guidance from central government;
  • an overly adversarial approach to dispute resolution;
  • complex processes that are unresponsive to changing demands;
  • an unhelpful focus on local issues, which has played a part in the wider national issue of rising land and house prices;
  • a lack of clear environmental priorities and direction on how to balance them; and
  • a virtual silence in the RMA on urban areas when compared with former planning acts.

To address the identified shortcomings, the draft report recommends:

  • greater central government intervention powers including the ability to override local plans in a limited set of circumstances, to co-ordinate or require common land use regulatory approaches to specific issues, and to direct council infrastructure providers where there is need to ensure a credible commitment to reducing land prices;
  • a presumption that favours development in urban areas, subject to clear limits;
  • the development of a Government Policy Statement on Environment Sustainability which sets out clear environmental priorities and principles to assist decision makers in prioritising environmental issues and which replaces National Policy Statements and National Environmental Standards;
  • a distinction between built and natural environments, with clear and separate goals for each;
  • the establishment of a permanent Independent Hearings Panel to consider plan changes and plan reviews, narrower access to appeals, and more stringent notification requirements;
  • more responsive rezoning to allow for better management of imbalanced land markets; and
  • infrastructure pricing that more accurately reflects costs, use and impacts.

The Commission is still considering:

  • legislative separation of planning and environmental protection either by way of clear separation of the natural and built environment within a single resource management law or the establishment of two separate laws; and
  • centralisation of environmental regulation, enforcement and monitoring through expanding the Environmental Protection Authority and establishing a network of regional offices, or greater oversight of council monitoring and enforcement activities.

The Commission has been influential with the Government in recent years, and we would expect any report which emerges to be relied on by this and future Governments for any changes to land use planning beyond the RMA reform currently taking place.

The Commission is currently inviting submissions on the draft report from all interested parties. In order to facilitate this process, the draft report contains a list of key questions on which the Commission is seeking feedback. Submissions close 3 October 2016.

The Commission will present its final report to Government on 30 November 2016.

The Government press release is available here. A further announcement can be found on the Productivity Commission’s website here and the ‘Better urban planning: Draft report’ can be found in full here.


Takeovers Panel signs MOU with Financial Markets Authority

The Takeovers Panel (Panel) and the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) have announced the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the two agencies.

The MOU sets a framework for engagement and cooperation between the two regulators, and outlines their commitment to:

  • identify common regulatory objectives and roles;
  • support each other in fulfilling each agency’s primary statutory objectives; and
  • record the spirit of cooperation that will operate between the agencies.

The MOU is governed by a set of relationship and cooperation principles, namely:

  • promptly referring relevant complaints and providing information to the other agency where appropriate;
  • responding promptly to contact from the other;
  • working together, so far as is practicable, to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of each agency’s investigations and enforcement;
  • adopting a ‘no surprises’ approach, by advising each other early of any identified issues that might affect the other party; and
  • communicating and sharing information and know-how to improve the effective delivery of the agencies' respective statutory functions in regard to financial products and financial services.

The MOU also addresses information sharing between the two agencies, and records that “the exchange of full information in a timely manner is essential to both the FMA and Panel”. Therefore, under the MOU, both agencies agree to make relevant information available to the other in a timely and efficient manner, subject to statutory constraints.

This MOU complements the MOU signed between the Panel and the NZX in May 2015.

The MOU can be accessed here, and the associated press release can be accessed here.


Progress of legislation

New Bills

Airport Authorities (Publicising Lost Property Sales) Amendment Bill
Type: Member’s
Member in charge: Nuk Korako
This Bill aims to amend the Airport Authorities Act 1966. Under the principal Act, property that has gone unclaimed for three months can be auctioned off by airport authorities only after such auction is advertised in the local newspaper. Clause four of the Bill would amend this provision so that airport authorities would only be required to publicise the auction in what the airport authorities consider to be a “fair and reasonable manner”.

Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill
Type: Member‘s
Member in charge: Matt Doocey
This Bill intends to amend the Companies Act 1993. Under the principal Act, companies are required to send a hardcopy of their annual report to shareholders, or ask shareholders whether they would like to receive a hardcopy annual report. The Bill would replace this provision with a requirement that a company must ask, on a one-off occasion, whether a shareholder would like to receive hardcopies or electronic copies of the annual report. Under the Bill, if the shareholder makes no election, they will receive neither an electronic or hardcopy report.

Education (Update) Amendment Bill
Type: Government
Member in charge: Hon Hekia Parata
This Bill aims to amend the Education Act 1989. The Bill would implement a raft of changes to the principal Act, including reforms to ‘correspondence’ education by establishing Communities of Online Learning (COOLs). The Bill would enable the Minister to accredit education providers as COOLs which would include schools, tertiary education providers, and other corporate entities. The Bill would also amend the principal Act by setting out a new planning and reporting process for schools, and a new articulation of the roles and responsibilities of school boards and trustees. In addition, the Bill would empower the Minister to set national performance measures for schooling. Further, the Bill intends to rework the current legislative framework for State integrated schools. For example, the Bill would create a statutory power for the Minister to require financial information from State integrated schools in certain situations. The Bill also seeks to disestablish Careers New Zealand as a Crown Entity provider of career information to New Zealanders. Instead, the Tertiary Education Commission would provide a similar careers service if the Bill is enacted.

Enhancing Identity Verification and Border Processes Legislation Bill 
Type: Government 
Member in charge: Hon Amy Adams
This omnibus Bill aims to amend a number of Acts with the goal of allowing greater information flow between government agencies in relation to personal information. Those are:

  • Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration Act 1995;
  • Customs and Excise Act 1996;
  • Immigration Act 2009;
  • Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003;
  • Land Transport Act 1998;
  • Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992;
  • Parole Act 2002; and
  • Privacy Act 1993;
  • Sentencing Act 2002.

The Bill is a response to the vulnerabilities in current legislation exposed during the Inquiry into Matters Concerning the Escape of Phillip John Smith/Traynor in 2015. The Bill intends to authorise justice, identity, and border agencies to share information in order to verify the identity of offenders and mental health patients subject to the criminal justice system. For example, the Bill seeks to enable police to access real-time identity information from Corrections about a dangerous offender who is unaccounted for while Customs would also immediately know if an escapee tries to leave the country.

Imprest Supply (Second for 2016/17) Act 2016
Type: Government
Member in charge: Hon Bill English
This Bill has since passed into law and is discussed in the Acts Assented section below.

Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill
Type: Member’s 
Member in charge: Rt Hon Winston Peters
This Bill intends to amend the Land Transfer Act 1952. If enacted, the Bill would amend the principal Act by inserting a provision that would establish a publicly available register of all foreign-owned land in New Zealand to be maintained by Land Information New Zealand. The register would be an electronic database containing the details of registered proprietors who are overseas persons, including: the proprietor’s name and nationality, the amount and value of the land involved; and the district or districts where the land is situated. The definition of ‘overseas person’ in the Bill is the same as in the Overseas Investment Act 2005. Broadly, this is an individual who is neither a New Zealand citizen nor ordinarily resident in New Zealand.

New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill
Type: Government 
Member in charge: Rt Hon John Key
This Bill is intended to implement the Government’s response to the Report of the First Independent Review of Intelligence and Security in New Zealand: Intelligence and Security in a Free Society (Report)The Report was compiled by Hon Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy, whose mandate was to review the current legislation governing intelligence and security agencies, as well as their oversight bodies (the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security and the Intelligence and Security Committee). The most significant change proposed in this Bill is the intention to legislate for the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) and New Zealand Security Intelligence Service (NZSIS) in a single Act. The Bill would therefore replace the four current Acts that serve this purpose. The Bill would establish a single authorisation regime for both the GCSB and the NZSIS for otherwise unlawful activity. Additionally, the Bill intends to establish a warranting regime for otherwise unlawful activity. Under this proposed warranting regime, the Bill provides for two types of warrants: Type 1 and Type 2. A Type 1 intelligence warrant would involve an application made by the Director-General of an intelligence and security agency to the Attorney-General and the Chief Commissioner of Intelligence Warrants. A Type 2 warrant would be made by the Director-General of an intelligence and security agency to the Attorney-General and would not require the approval of the Chief Commissioner of Intelligence Warrants.

Further changes proposed by the Bill include: the acknowledgment of particular functions of the GCSB and the NZSIS in legislation for the first time, such as assumed identities and human intelligence activities; NZSIS would be established as a public service department under the State Sector Act 1988; an information sharing regime between the GCSB and NZSIS would be established; and the Bill would remove the current restriction on the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security inquiring into operationally sensitive matters, and would clarify that the Inspector-General may review warrants on substantive, as well as procedural, grounds.

Rangitāne Tū Mai Rā (Wairarapa Tamaki nui-ā-Rua) Claims Settlement Bill
Type: Government
Member in charge: Hon Christopher Finlayson
This Bill would give effect to the deed of settlement signed on 6 August 2016 by the Crown and Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Tamaki nui-ā-Rua by providing for the final settlement of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims made by Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Tamaki nui-ā-Rua. The Bill seeks to formally record a Crown apology to Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Tamaki nui-ā-Rua and provides a range of cultural and commercial redress to the iwi. The benefits of the settlement will be available to all members of Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Tamaki nui-ā-Rua, wherever they live. Separate legislation will give effect to specific cultural redress that is shared between Rangitāne o Wairarapa and Rangitāne o Tamaki nui-ā-Rua and Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa Tāmaki Nui-ā-Rua.

Residential Tenancies (Safe and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill
Type: Member’s
Member in charge: Metiria Turei
This Bill intends to amend the Residential Tenancy Act 1986 by making a number of changes designed to strengthen tenants’ rights. The Bill would give tenants a right of renewal on the home they live in once their lease period has ended; tenancy agreements would need to include an indication by the landlord as to what criteria they use to calculate rent increases; landlords would be prohibited from charging a leasing fee; fixed term tenancies would be for a default term of three years, with a provision for the parties to opt out and set their own term; rent rises would take place not more than once every 12 months; and landlords would not be able to give a reduced notice period of 42 days in the event that the rented property is to be sold. Rather, the standard 90 day notice period will apply.

Subordinate Legislation Confirmation Bill (No 2)
Type: Government                
Member in charge: Hon Gerry Brownlee
This Bill intends to ensure that particular subordinate legislation is not revoked by virtue of the principal Act being invalidated at a certain time. Such legislation has a condition that the subordinate legislation must be re-confirmed by an Act of Parliament. The Bill would be directed at items of subordinate legislation made or presented to the House in the year ending 30 June 2016. Those are:

  • two sets of regulations under the Animal Products Act 1999;
  • an order under the Biosecurity Act 1993;
  • two orders under the Commodity Levies Act 1990;
  • three orders under the Customs and Excise Act 1996;
  • regulations under the Energy (Fuels, Levies, and References) Act 1989;
  • an order under the Fisheries Act 1996;
  • regulations under the Gambling Act 2003;
  • regulations under the Land Transport Act 1998;
  • regulations under the National Animal Identification and Tracing Act 2012;
  • an order under the Social Security Act 1964;
  • an order under the Tariff Act 1988; and
  • two orders under the Wine Act 2003.

Taxation (Business Tax, Exchange of Information, and Remedial Matters) Bill 
Type: Government
Member in charge: Hon Michael Woodhouse
This omnibus Bill intends to amend the Income Tax Act 2007, the Tax Administration Act 1994 and Student Loan Scheme Act 2011. The proposed changes reflect three Government policy objectives; to simplify business taxations; implement the G20 / OECD standard of Financial Account Information in Tax Matters; and the implementation of disclosure requirements for foreign trusts as recommended by the Government Inquiry into Foreign Trust Disclosure Rules.

Telecommunications (Property Access and Other Matters) Amendment Bill
Type: Government
Member in charge: Hon Amy Adams
This Bill aims to amend the Telecommunications Act 2001 by creating a new consenting process that telecommunications companies must follow when installing networks such as Ultra Fast Broadband. This amendment is aimed at reducing compliance costs associated with the Telecommunications Development Levy. The Bill would implement a tiered consenting regime that would have different implications depending on impacts to shared property. The Bill would also implement a dedicated bodies corporate approval process. A dispute resolution process would also be established under the Bill that is intended to ensure a fair and efficient regime.


Bills awaiting first reading

Airport Authorities (Publicising Lost Property Sales) Amendment Bill
Companies (Annual Report Notice Requirements) Amendment Bill 
Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill 
Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill
Education (Update) Amendment Bill
Enhancing Identity Verification and Border Processes Legislation Bill 
Land Transfer (Foreign Ownership of Land Register) Amendment Bill 
Legislation Amendment Bill
Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill 
Our Work Our Future Bill
Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill
Rangitāne Tū Mai Rā (Wairarapa Tamaki nui-ā-Rua) Claims Settlement Bill 
Rates Rebate (Retirement Village Residents) Amendment Bill
Residential Tenancies (Safe and Secure Rentals) Amendment Bill


Bills defeated

Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill
Member in Charge: Peeni Henare
60 in favour: Labour 32; Green Party 14; New Zealand First 12; Māori Party 2.
61 Against: National 59; Act 1; United Future 1.


Bills before Select Committee

Submissions open

Bill

Select Committee

Closing date for Submissions (2016)

Food Safety Law Reform Bill

Primary Production

22 September

New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

7 October

Subordinate Legislation Confirmation Bill (No 2)

Regulations Review

Not Yet Called

Taxation (Business Tax, Exchange of Information, and Remedial Matters) Bill

Finance and Expenditure

9 September


Submissions closed

Bill

Select Committee

Report due (2016)

Children, Young Persons, and Their Families (Advocacy, Workforce, and Age Settings) Amendment Bill

Social Services

17 October

Contract and Commercial Law Bill

Justice and Electoral

14 December

Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill

Health

23 September

Fire and Emergency New Zealand Bill

Government and Administration

5 January (2017)

Geographical Indications (Wine and Spirits) Registration Amendment Bill

Primary Production

17 September

Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill (No 2)

Government Administration

4 November

Land Transfer Bill

Government Administration

15 September

Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2)

Local Government and Environment

28 October

Maritime Crimes Amendment Bill

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

5 January (2017)

New Zealand Horticulture Export Authority Amendment Bill

Primary Production

29 September

Ngāti Pūkenga Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

13 October

Ngāi Te Rangi and Ngā Pōtiki Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

25 November

Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

13 October

Rangitāne o Manawatu Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

15 September

Resource Legislation Amendment Bill

Local Government and Environment

6 September

Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Display of Low-alcohol Beverages and Other Remedial Matters) Amendment Bill

Justice and Electoral

5 November

Social Security Legislation Rewrite Bill

Social Services

15 September

Substance Addiction (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Bill

Health

15 September

Taranaki Iwi Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

15 September

Tauranga Moana Iwi Collective Redress and Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

13 October

Taxation (Annual Rates for 2016-17, Closely Held Companies, and Related Matters) Bill

Finance and Expenditure

15 December

Te Atiawa Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

15 September

Te Awa Tupua (Whanganui River Claims Settlement) Bill

Māori Affairs

25 November

Te Ture Whenua Māori Bill

Māori Affairs

11 November

Telecommunications (Property Access and Other Matters) Amendment Bill

Commerce

7 November

Trade (Anti-dumping and Countervailing Duties) Amendment Bill

Commerce

28 December

Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Amendment Bill

Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade

12 November

Wildlife (Powers) Amendment Bill

Local Government and Environment

29 September

 

Bills awaiting second reading

Bills that have recently been reported back to the House from a Select Committee are in bold and the Select Committee reports on these Bills are linked.

Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Amendment Bill
Civil Defence Emergency Management Amendment Bill as reported by the Government Administration Committee
Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill
Building (Pools) Amendment Bill
Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill
Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Bill as reported by the Local Government and Environment Committee
Land Transport (Admissibility of Evidential Breath Tests) Amendment Bill
Māori Purposes Bill
Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill as reported by the Transport and Industrial Relations Committee
Papawai and Kaikokirikiri Trusts Amendment Bill as reported by the Māori Affairs Committee
Patents (Trans-Tasman Patent Attorneys and Other Matters) Amendment Bill as reported by the Commerce Committee
Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill
Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill
Statutes Amendment Bill as reported by the Government Administration Committee
Taxation (Income-sharing Tax Credit) Bill


Bills awaiting third reading

Child Protection (Child Sex Offender Register) Bill
Commerce (Cartels and Other Matters) Amendment Bill
Drug and Alcohol Testing of Community-based Offenders, Bailees and Other Persons Legislation Bill (formerly the Drug and Alcohol Testing of Community-based Offenders and Bailees Legislation Bill)
Education Legislation Bill
Electronic Monitoring of Offenders Legislation Bill
Evidence Amendment Bill
Insolvency Practitioners Bill
Judicature Modernisation Bill
Natural Health and Supplementary Products Bill (formerly the Natural Health Products Bill)
Ngāruahine Claims Settlement Bill


Acts assented

Appropriation (2016/2017 Estimates) Act 2016
This Act provides parliamentary authorisation of the individual appropriations and changes contained in “The Estimates of Appropriations for the Government of New Zealand for the year ending 30 June 2017”. These estimates were presented to the House as part of the 2016 Budget process.

Canterbury Property Boundaries and Related Matters Act 2016
This Act provides clarity for property rights in Canterbury that have been in flux since the land was affected by movement from the 2010 and 2011 earthquakes. The Act clarifies that the legal boundaries of land in greater Christchurch have moved with the land movement from the earthquakes. Under the Act, the Surveyor-General is therefore mandated to issue guidance for surveyors to allow for a consistent application of standards in the Cadastral Survey Act 2002. The Act also confirms existing rights of registered owners, such as indefeasibility.

Imprest Supply (Second for 2016/17) Act 2016
This Bill would provide the Government with financial authority additional to that sought in the Appropriation (2016/2015 Estimates) Bill to ensure the Government has sufficient supply to implement Cabinet decisions. The Bill provides for its repeal at the end of the 2016/17 financial year when it will be replaced by an Appropriation Act.

Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Act 2016
This Act amends the Official Information Act 1982 by defining the Parliamentary Under-Secretary as a Minister of the Crown in the interpretation section (section two). This has the effect of making Parliamentary Under-Secretaries subject to the Official Information Act 1982 in the same way Ministers of the Crown are.

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind Act Repeal Act 2016
This Act repeals the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind Act 2002. This principal Act constituted the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind as a body corporate but provided an option for the Foundation to register as an incorporated society. As the Foundation has exercised this option, the principal Act is spent and repealing the principal Act addresses this.

Shop Trading Hours Amendment Act 2016
This Act amends the Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal Act 1990 to grant territorial authorities a limited power to create bylaws that allow shop trading on Easter Sunday. The Act also amends the name of the principal Act to the Shop Trading Hours Act 1990. Further, the Act gives shop employees the right to refuse to work on Easter Sunday and requires employers to inform employees of this right.

Social Security (Extension of Young Persons Services and Remedial Matters) Amendment Act 2016
This Act amends the Social Security Act 1964 by extending the existing Youth Service to all 19 year-old beneficiaries with children, and to 18 and 19 year-old beneficiaries without children who are considered at significant risk of long term welfare dependency. Under the Act, 19 year-old parent beneficiaries will now have youth activity obligations, including being in fulltime education towards NCEA Level 2, and undertaking both budgeting parenting courses. If these targets are met, incentive payments of $10 a week will be made. 18 and 19 year-old beneficiaries without children who are at risk of welfare dependency in the long term will be assisted to find work or supported back into education if they have not achieved NCEA Level 2.


Legislative instruments

Animal Welfare (Calves) Regulations 2016
Animal Welfare (Export of Livestock for Slaughter) Regulations 2016
Animal Welfare Amendment Act (No 2) 2015 Commencement Order 2016
Criminal Procedure Amendment Rules 2016
Education (2017 School Staffing) Order 2016
Financial Markets Conduct (Employee Share Purchase Schemes) Exemption Notice 2016
Fisheries (Cost Recovery Levies for Conservation Services) Order 2016
Fisheries (Cost Recovery Levies for Fisheries Services) Order 2016
Fisheries (Kaikoura–Wakatu Quay Temporary Closure) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tāngata Kaitiaki/Tiaki for Area/Rohe Moana of Kaiaio Hapū) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tāngata Kaitiaki/Tiaki for Area/Rohe Moana of Te Whanau a Kauaetangohia Hapū) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tangata Kaitiaki/Tiaki for Te Hoe Mātaitai Reserve) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tāngata Tiaki/Kaitiaki for Area/Rohe Moana of Ōnuku Rūnanga) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tāngata Tiaki/Kaitiaki for Mātaitai Reserve at Kaihoka Point and Anatori) Notice 2016
Gambling (Venue Payments) Regulations 2016
Gambling Amendment Act (No 2) 2015 Commencement Order 2016
Health and Safety at Work (Major Hazard Facilities) Amendment Regulations 2016
Housing Accords and Special Housing Areas (Nelson—New July 2016 Areas) Order 2016
Housing Accords and Special Housing Areas (Queenstown—New July 2016 Area) Order 2016
Income Tax (Deemed Rate of Return on Attributing Interests in Foreign Investment Funds, 2015–16 Income Year) Order 2016
Medicines (Deferral of Expiry of Part 7A) Order 2016
Medicines (Standing Order) Amendment Regulations 2016
Misuse of Drugs Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2016
New Zealand General Service Medal (Greater Middle East) Regulations 2016
New Zealand General Service Medal (Iraq 2015) Regulations 2016
New Zealand Horticulture Export Authority (Nashi/Asian Pear) Revocation Order 2016
Ombudsmen Act (Schedule 1—Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Oranga Tamariki) Order 2016
Road User Charges (Exemption Period for Light Electric RUC Vehicles) Amendment Order 2016
State Sector (Ministry for Vulnerable Children, Oranga Tamariki) Order 2016
Submarine Cables and Pipelines Protection Order 2009 Amendment Order 2016
Tax Administration (Hawke’s Bay Medical Event) Order 2016
Veterans’ Support Amendment Regulations (No 4) 2016
Vulnerable Children (Specified Organisations and Regulated Services) Regulations 2016


In the week ahead

What’s coming up in the House?

When the House resumes on Tuesday, 7 September the Government will look to complete the second readings of the Māori Purposes Bill, the Building (Pools) Amendment Bill, and the Statutes Amendment Bill, the first reading of the Enhancing Identity Verification and Border Processes Legislation Bill, and a number of other bills on the Order Paper.


Speeches of note

Chief Ombudsman speaks at Transparency International Forum

The role of the Ombudsman in promoting transparency was considered by Chief Ombudsman Judge Peter Boshier in his 13 July 2016 address to Transparency International’s Leader’s Integrity Forum.

The theme of the forum was the role of information in generating transparency, and in that context, Judge Boshier considered the role that both the Official Information Act 1982 (OIA) and the Ombudsman play in monitoring integrity systems.

Following a brief summary of the purpose of the OIA scheme, Judge Boshier considered what was and was not working well in terms of agency compliance and the Ombudsman’s role.

Referring to former Chief Ombudsman Dame Beverley Wakem’s 8 December 2015 report, Judge Boshier explained that agencies were, for the most part, genuinely committed to ensuring compliance. However, issues remained:

  • Many agencies’ processes risked breaching the OIA in terms of both the quality of responses to official information requests and the time taken to compile them.
  • Better leadership is needed from Ministers and Chief Executives in terms of what is expected of agencies in complying with the OIA and engaging with the public.
  • Better training is required to ensure that staff understand how the OIA works, and agencies need to ensure that they have adequate numbers of staff and quality of systems to process requests.
  • Agencies should be proactive in their compliance with the law, and adapt their websites to ensure that it is relatively easy for members of the public to make a request.

Judge Boshier noted that he is impressed with the quality of work produced by the Office of the Ombudsman (Office), however staff are struggling with the sheer volume of complaints received. The 12,590 complaints received in the 2015/16 year represented a 44% increase on volume of work received in 2010/11. In an attempt to reduce complaints, the Office has produced a number of comprehensive guides on the Act, as well as providing training sessions to agencies and responding to specific requests for assistance with compliance. Time taken by the Office to respond to complaints remained an ongoing issue, and was identified by Judge Boshier as an area for improvement.

Looking ahead, Judge Boshier’s recent Strategic Intentions document sets targets for the office for the next four years. Over the next three years, the office aims to drastically reduce time taken to process complaints and has set a three month target for dealing with the majority (70%) of new complaints.

Under the new plan, agencies will be expected to promote flexible engagement with the Office, with some agencies to be asked to enter into memorandums of understanding with the Office. Additional funding from Parliament will be used to establish a team to review and monitor agency compliance. Judge Boshier also intends to publish official information statistics as a means of encouraging agency compliance. For complaints closed from 1 July 2016 onwards, agencies can expect to begin seeing regular reporting on complaint statistics.

A transcript of Judge Boshier’s speech can be read here. A copy of the Strategic Intentions report can be found here. Dame Beverley Wakem’s report can be read here.


New Zealand’s role in setting trade policy

In his 1 August speech to the Trans-Tasman Business Circle, Minister for Trade, Hon Todd McClay, announced the Government's plan to refresh New Zealand's trade policy strategy.

The Minister explained that the changes to the policy strategy needed to be understood in the context of global trade developments. Since 1993, New Zealand’s trade policy has focussed on four key initiatives, those being unilateral, bilateral, regional and multilateral. Changes in the global environment and markets in that time have affected how New Zealand’s effort and resources should be applied in relation to each of the initiatives.

Looking ahead, Mr McClay considered that trade policy strategy should be driven by four broad shifts in focus. Those are:

  • Improving existing trade agreements rather than signing up to new ones: 52% of New Zealand’s exports are currently covered by existing Free Trade Agreements (FTA), which will increase to 90% following the implementation of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the conclusion of current negotiations. Implementing and upgrading those FTAs will soon be more important than entering into new agreements.
  • Reducing barriers on exporters: New Zealand’s existing FTAs have proved beneficial for exporters, however certain industries were still negatively affected by tariffs and non-tariff barriers. Future negotiations will be focussed on renegotiating existing agreements to alleviate these barriers.
  • Closing the gap: New Zealand’s geographic isolation from global markets has long proved difficult for businesses. An increasing focus on services, digital products and E-commerce will level the playing field for exporters.
  • Government assistance: businesses can expect support from the Government in ensuring that they are able to compete in a global market.

Despite Minister McClay noting that the World Trade Organisation (WTO) had not operated as effectively as the Government thought it would when the trade policy strategy was first developed, he nonetheless considered that the WTO could play an integral role in simplifying trade agreements and challenging protectionism, thus ensuring a level playing field for all trade participants.

As a first step of the trade policy strategy update, public meetings will be held in New Zealand’s main centres.

A transcript of the Minister’s speech can be found here.


In trade

China tightens import requirements for wine and honey

Chinese authorities have begun work on strengthening the import specifications for wine and honey products. When the new regime is implemented, only products that have been produced by a manufacturer approved by the Chinese Certification and Accreditation Administration (CNCA) will be allowed entry into China.

While the precise requirements for approval are not yet known, the CNCA regime has been applied to other ‘high-risk’ goods, and in those cases it requires onsite inspection, audit and registration of manufacturers before goods can make it to the Chinese market. In the case of wine, the new requirements are likely to include a traceability programme to address the problem of counterfeit wine imports.

Because it is relatively stringent, the effects of the CNCA regime can be dramatic for manufacturers. In May 2014, for example, CNCA decided that dairy products were high-risk, and should be subject to mandatory approval and inspection requirements. This meant that New Zealand dairy exporters (and infant formula exporters in particular), found themselves denied access to their largest market. They were forced to seek approval before they could continue to export, and many of them went under as a result. In order to avoid similar issues with wine and honey, and to facilitate a smoother transition to the new regime, the Ministry for Primary Industries has been monitoring the Chinese review for some time, and has been communicating with the relevant Chinese authorities.

New Zealand honey products are becoming increasingly popular among Chinese consumers who view Manuka honey's apparent antibacterial qualities as a ‘natural’ remedy. The result is that the Chinese market for Manuka products is growing rapidly (it was worth $45.3 million to New Zealand companies last year), leading to a need for more robust regulation. Similarly, while the Chinese market accounts for a relatively small portion of New Zealand’s wine exports ($27.1 million of a total of $1.4 billion), the Chief Executive of the New Zealand Wine Growers’ Association has noted that it is perceived as a major growth market for the sector, and that there may be some wineries that are heavily dependent on the Chinese market.

Without proper preparation, therefore, changes to the Chinese import regime are potentially disruptive for some New Zealand exporters. Wine and honey manufacturers with markets in China should ensure that they are aware of and ready for the new regime, which is expected to be introduced in mid-2017.


In consultation

New

Who

What

By when (2016)

Commerce Commission

Consultation on discussion paper on backhaul services under section 9A of the Telecommunications Act

23 September

Waikato and North Island Voltage Management.

30 September

Department of Conservation

Discussion paper for a proposed conservation and environment science roadmap.

7 September

Intention to grant concession to Brenda Harland for horse corrals over part of Westwood Recreation Reserve.

9 September

Intention to grant a lease/easement concession to Ski Touring Club Inc over part of the Craigieburn Conservation Park.

16 September

Request for business proposals at Ongarue Village.

23 September

Draft Te Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island Nature Reserve Conservation Management Plan.

11 October

National Strategy for Environment Education for Sustainability.

10 October

Proposal to dispose of conservation land near Tunnel Rocks Scenic Reserve.

14 October

Review of the Management Plan for the Westland Tai Poutini National Park

21 October

Electricity Authority

Changes to Financial Transmission Rights Allocation plan.

13 September

Consultation on reorienting advisory group structures.

20 September

Consultation on proposed extended reserve Code amendments.

4 October

Environmental Protection Authority

Application to import an insecticide, called Celsius, to control pests found in kiwifruit, pipfruit and potato crops.

9 September

Financial Markets Authority

Consultation on the Financial Market Authority’s document, ‘A guide to the FMA’s view of conduct’.

31 October

Food Standards New Zealand

Application to approve food derived from a genetically modified potato line, E12, which has reduced acrylamide potential and reduced browning (blackspot bruises).

30 September

Inland Revenue Department

Comment on Interpretation Statement which discusses general principles about when professionals can account for their income on a cash accounting basis and when they must use an accrual accounting basis.

22 September

Ministry for Primary Industries

Invitation to provide comment on proposals for a Biosecurity 2025 direction statement to replace the 2003 Biosecurity strategy.

9 September

Proposed changes to the new Import Health Standard for returned New Zealand animal products.

19 September

Proposed changes to the Import Health Standard and the transitional facility standard for ornamental fish and marine invertebrates.

22 September

Proposed amendment to Import Health Standard BNZ-IMP-TUBER: Importation into New Zealand of specified fresh and frozen Tuber species (truffles).

14 October

Ministry for the Environment

Proposed regulation of jettisoned material from space launch vehicles in New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone.

16 September

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Discussion Paper: Accessibility of retirement savings in bankruptcy for the repayment of creditors.

30 September

Consultation Report No. 1 of the Insolvency Working Group: Insolvency Practitioner regulation and voluntary liquidations.

7 October

Consultation for Amending B1/AS1 Acceptable Solution and B1/VM1 Verification Method for Grade 500E Ductile Steel Mesh.

8 September

Ministry of Education

Discussion Document: proposed changes to the Export Education Levy.

8 September

Halswell community engagement on proposed new primary education provision.

30 September

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Call for submissions from New Zealand exporters to the United Kingdom following the referendum to leave the European Union.

14 October

Ministry of Health

Discussion document: Health of Older People Strategy.

7 September

Consultation on policy options for the regulation of e-cigarettes, including possible amendments to the Smoke Free Environments Act 1990.

12 September

Discussion document: Revised approach to drug utensils and their effectiveness in achieving the goal of a National Drug Policy.

20 September

Ministry of Justice

Proposed changes to improve New Zealand’s ability to tackle money laundering and terrorist financing.

16 September

Seeking feedback on a draft framework to establish a consistent and co-ordinated approach to effectively identifying, assessing and managing the risks of family violence.

16 September

New Zealand Productivity Commission

Submissions on the Better Urban Planning Draft Report has been released and submissions on it have been called.

3 October

New Zealand Transport Authority

Draft revised accidental archaeological discovery specification.

3 October

New Zealand Qualifications Authority

Proposed Level 2 Early Childhood Learning and Care unit standards; Proposed Level 3 ECE unit standards; and Proposed Level 4 ECE unit standards.

19 September

Pharmac

Proposal to list enteral feed with fibre 0.83kcal/ml (Nutrison 800 Complete Multi Fibre).

12 September

Implementation of Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement provisions.

28 October

Standards New Zealand – Joint Standards

Safety standard to provide design rules for steel and steelconcrete composite bridges, or member within bridges – DR AS/NZ 5100.6:2016.

7 September

Safety standard to provide guidelines for the successful management of the disturbance or removal of paints containing hazardous metallic pigments used on industrial steel structures – DR AS/NZ 4361.1:2016.

27 September

Safety standard to provide guidance and recommended good practice for the design, application and maintenance of decorative paint systems for use by the paint industry in the development of painting specifications – DR2 AS/NZS 2311:2016.

19 September

Amendment to safety standards relevant to gate valves for waterworks purposes – AS/NZS 2638.1.2011 Amd 1:2016 and AS/NZS 2638.2:2011 Amd 1:2016.

18 October

Safety standard for providing a method for determining the colour of paper and board by diffuse reflectance under indoor daylight conditions. DR AS/NZS 1301.540:2016.

4 October

Safety standards for reconstituted wood-based panels – methods of testing. Objectives of this revision are to update test methods, consolidate test method standards and adopt ISO versions of test methods where appropriate – DR AS/NZ 4266.1:2016 and DR AS/NZS 4266.2.2016.

1 November

Safety standard for safety of toys – determination of total concentration of certain elements in toys. DR AS/NZS 8124.12.2016.

2 November

Safety standard to provide best practice requirements for fabrication and erection of structural steel members, components and structural assemblies used for load-carrying purposes in buildings, bridges and other structures. DR AS/NZS 5131:2016.

2 November

Safety standard to specify electrical safety requirements for self-ballasted LED-lamps, intended for general lighting services, with a rate voltage of >50 V. DR AS/NZS 62560:2016.

7 October

Safety standard to describe the test methods for the determination of the characteristics of combustible dusts, to enable the proper selection and installation of equipment for use in the presence of combustible dust test methods. DR AS/NZS 80079.20.2:2016.

6 October

Safety standard to provide manufacturers, designers and users of gypsum linings with requirements for the application and finishing of such linings in residential and commercial construction applications. DR AS/NZS 2589:2016.

4 October

Amendment to safety standard for electrical equipment for mines and quarries. DR AS/NZS 4871.3:2010 A1: 2016.

4 October

Safety standard to provide a method for determining the colour of paper and board by diffuse reflectance under indoor daylight conditions. DR AS/NZS 1301.530:2016.

28 September

Amendment to safety standard for approval and test specification – electrical portable device outlet devices. DR AS/NZS 3105:2014 A1:2016.

19 October

Amendment to safety standard for Edison screw lampholders (IEC 60238, Ed. 8.2 (2011) MOD). DR AS/NZS 60238:2015 A2:2016.

19 October

Amendment to safety standard for Bayonet lampholders (IEC 61184, Ed. 3.1 (2011) MOD) DR AS/NZS 61184:2015 A2:2016.

19 October

Safety standard to provide manufacturers, designers, certifiers and users of glued laminated structural timber, with minimum product performance requirements that will facilitate the safe use of glued laminated timber in structures. DR AS/NZS 1328:2016.

1 November

Amendment to safety standard for the storage and handling of LP Gas. DR AS/NZS 1596:2016.

1 November

Safety standard to specify performance requirements for the manufacture and application of particleboard. DR AS/NZS 1859.1:2016.

1 November

Safety standard to specify the product requirements for three types of dry process fibreboards – ultra-low density, low density, medium density – for use under two service conditions – dry (STD) and moisture resistant (MR) – and as described under Clause 5. DR AS/NZ 1859.2:2016.

1 November

Safety standard to provide performance requirements and specifications for the manufacture and application of decorative overlaid wood panels. DR AS/NZS 1859.3:2016.

1 November

Safety standard to specify performance requirements in the manufacture and application of particleboard flooring. DR AS/NZS 1860.1:2016.

1 November

Safety standard to provide manufacturers, installers and designers with the requirements for the design, manufacture and proper implementation of scaffold decking components. DR AS/NZS 1577:2016.

2 November

Amendment to safety standard for Gas installations: LP Gas installations in caravans and boats for non-propulsive purposes. DR AS/NZS 5601.2:2013 A2:2016.

28 September

Safety standard to provide requirements intended to reduce the risks to children when finger paints are used as intended or in a foreseeable way, bearing in mind the behaviour of children. DR AS/NZS 8124.7:2016.

2 November

Takeovers Panel

Proposal to change the small code companies class exemption by allowing small, unlisted Code companies to opt out of the Code when raising capital by share allotments.

23 September

WorkSafe

Proposal to revoke the Approved Code of Practice for Managing Hazards to Prevent Major Industrial Accidents.

23 September

Current

Who

What

By when (2016)

Commerce Commission

Consultation on the Telecommunications Development Levy for the 2015/16 year.

11 November

Department of Conservation

 

Review of the Westland Tai Poutini National Park Management Plan in accordance with the National Parks Act 1980.

21 October

 

Aoraki/Mount Cook National Park Management Plan Review; pre-draft consultation.

28 October

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

International climate change negotiations and issues.

ongoing

Ministry of Health

The Regulation of Natural Health Products. List of draft permitted substances and conditions.

31 October


This publication is intended only to provide a summary of the subject covered. It does not purport to be comprehensive or to provide legal advice. No person should act in reliance on any statement contained in this publication without first obtaining specific professional advice. If you require any advice or further information on the subject matter of this newsletter, please contact the partner/solicitor in the firm who normally advises you, or alternatively contact one of the partners listed below.

Read more:
Watching Brief
Talk to one of our experts:
Related Expertise